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Historic District

The Naperville Local Historic District is a local district designation granted by the Naperville City Council in 1986. Currently, the city has approximately 320 properties within the Naperville Local Historic District that includes part of the North Central College Campus and 253 homes. These buildings, structures, and sites represent significant examples of local architecture and are among the city's most important cultural and historical heritage. They contribute to the city's character, quality of life and economic vibrancy and also bring visitors to the area.

Current and future residents in the Historic District are encouraged to improve their properties through renovation, rehabilitation, and repair that are consistent with the historic, architectural and aesthetic character of the neighborhood.  Properties located within the district receive increased protection through regulations set forth in the Naperville Historic Preservation Ordinance (Section 6-11 of the Municipal Code) under the oversight of the Historic Preservation Commission.

In 2008, The City of Naperville conducted an Architectural and Historical Survey to assess approximately 310 structures located within Naperville’s local Historic District and two local landmark structures. The survey serves as a record of the properties’ historical significance, and provides information about diverse architectural styles, periods, history and unique features of designated historic structures.

Architectural and Historical Survey

Following is the data obtained through the city's Architectural and Historical Survey as well as the introduction report (PDF) summarizing the data. The data for each individual property is organized by street address.

Local Significance Ratings

Below are descriptions of the Architectural and Historical Survey’s local significance ratings.

Significant (S)

  • Age. Must be at least 50 years old.
  • Architectural Merit. Must possess architectural distinction in one of the following when compared with other buildings of its type: architectural style or type valuable for a study of a period, style, method of construction, or use of indigenous materials; exceptional craftsmanship; work of a master builder or architect.  
  • Integrity. High style examples must possess a relatively high degree of integrity in its design, materials, workmanship, setting, location, feeling, and association. Allowed alterations for significant high style buildings include replacement windows in original openings with appropriate configurations; replacement porches; side additions that are set back from the front façade; and replacement siding that is either historically appropriate or removable. Vernacular and popular types (i.e. Gable Front, Gabled Ell, Upright and Wing, American Foursquare, Bungalow) must have a very high degree of integrity in its design, materials, workmanship, setting, location, feeling, and association, for example, all architectural detailing in place; no historic materials or details covered up; no unsympathetic and/or overpowering additions. 

Potentially Significant (PS)

  • Age. Must be at least 50 years old.
  • Architectural Merit. Must possess architectural distinction in one of the following when compared with other buildings of its type: architectural style or type valuable for a study of a period, style, method of construction, or use of indigenous materials; exceptional craftsmanship; work of a master builder or architect.
  • Integrity. High style examples must display a moderate degree of integrity. Allowed alterations are similar to those for a significant rating, but also include some replacement windows in altered openings and side additions that are flush with the front façade but are clearly discernable from the original structure. Vernacular or popular types must have a high degree of integrity in its design, materials, workmanship, setting, location, feeling, and association, for example, some architectural detailing in place; minor or reversible alterations.

Contributing (C)

  • Age. Must be at least 50 years old.
  • Architectural Merit. Does not necessarily possess individual distinction, but is a historic structure with the characteristic design and details of its period.
  • Integrity. High style examples may have a modest degree of integrity, with substantial alterations and/or additions that affect the integrity but do not completely obscure the original building. Acceptable alterations include side or front additions that are discernible from the original structure, raised rooflines that preserve the original type of roof, and a number of various smaller alterations and additions that still allow the original building to be perceptible. Vernacular or popular types may have a moderate degree of integrity, but are of a common design with no particular architectural distinction to set them apart from others of their types.

Non-contributing (NC)

  • Age. Buildings less than 50 years old. 
  • Integrity. Any building at least 50 years old whose integrity is so poor that all historic materials and details are missing or completely covered up and its historic massing and/or roofline cannot be discerned. Poor integrity was present if all these factors were missing: original shape and/or massing; original siding; original windows and window openings; original architectural detail and trim.
Naperville Local Landmarks

In addition to the Naperville Local Historic District, the city maintains a local register of historic landmarks. Local landmarks are designated by the Naperville City Council and are subject to the same regulations as properties located within the local Historic District.

The following three properties have been recognized as local historic landmarks: