Environmental Sustainability

In 2010, the Naperville City Council approved the Environmental Sustainability Plan. The plan established a long-term vision for environmental sustainability in Naperville and serves as a guide for the city’s actions related to environmental leadership and initiatives.

The framework of the plan is organized around five categories including Leadership & Education, Resources & Energy, Transportation and Mobility, Waste Management and Recycling and Sustainable Development and Infrastructure. The categories were developed following an environmental sustainability inventory report in 2007.

Since approving the plan, Naperville has implemented a number of initiatives and programs that positively impacted the community and environment. The efforts of the City are documented in an annual sustainability report.

News

Pile of leavesLeave the Leaves

Here are some quick suggestions for using fall leaves that are good for the environment, plus save you time and money. 

  1. Compost your leaves. Chop them up first to speed up decomposition. Leaf mold (composted leaves) makes wonderful mulch and vegetable garden amendment and has several uses in organic lawn care.
  2. Let fallen leaves (and fallen twigs) remain around plants in a native savanna or woodland garden. This is the way nature mulches. You can also shred leaves by passing a mower over a leaf pile several times and spread the chopped leaves as mulch. Shredding speeds decomposition and reduces leaves from blowing away. If you still like the look of mulch, spread a very thin layer of mulch on top. Mulching with leaves not only saves you money on wood mulch but also:
    • Provides nesting material for many types of birds, especially in early spring; and
    • Provides shelter for small animals and insects, especially over the winter; and 
    • Provides food for many types of insects; and
    • Adds organic matter to the soil, retains moisture and reduces weeds.

First-Ever Naperville Earth Week was a huge success!

Earth week logoEarth Day and Arbor Day anchored “Earth Week Naperville,”  a community-wide volunteer event that made great strides in making a positive difference in our community.

Hundreds of residents took advantage of educational and volunteer opportunities across the city during this special week. Organized in partnership with 12 contributing organizations and four sponsors, this inaugural event was quite successful in raising community awareness and volunteerism.  As a part of the program, the City of Naperville Public Works held the 27th annual Arbor Day tree sale with over 497 trees sold and 300 live souvenir trees distributed. The Conservation Foundation was on hand to distribute pre-purchased rain barrels. Thank you to the almost 1,000 volunteers, logging over 1,300 service hours, who did their part to make Earth Week Naperville a success!

Earth Week Naperville 2018 will be April 21-28. Check back to sign-up for events and volunteer opportunities in early 2018.

National Mayor's Challenge for Water Conservation

SustainabilityMayor Steve Chirico  joined mayors across the country in asking residents to make a long-term commitment to manage water resources more wisely by taking part in the annual Wyland National Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation. Residents were able to make pledges from April 1-April 30, 2017.

The results are in! Naperville ranked #12 in our population category of the 2017 Wyland National Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation! 

Thank you to everyone who participated and made the pledge to help Naperville become a water and energy saving community! The competition mode is over, but you and your family can still make a pledge that lasts all year long! Make a pledge at www.mywaterpledge.com from now until March 31, 2018 and you’ll be entered to win a piece of art picked out by marine life artist and conservationist Wyland.

Take the Pledge

Pollination Station

Pollination Station in JuneThe City of Naperville is proud to have planted a pollination station in a plot of land above the east entrance to the lower level of the Municipal Center. This garden features a variety of native plant species that can offer a habitat for butterflies and other pollinators. This demonstration garden is a way to educate our community on the benefits of alternate landscaping options and inspire them to learn more about this type of gardening.

Learn about Naperville's Pollination Station

A Beautiful Yard without Pesticides

Studies show that use of lawn chemicals can have environmental ramifications, especially for children. The chemicals can potentially contaminate surface and groundwater, affect outdoor and indoor air quality, and threaten the health of pets and wildlife. Have you considered alternative approaches, such as:

  • Leave grass clippings on the lawn to act as a natural fertilizer.
  • Overseed to fill in existing bare spots in the late summer or early fall.  This approach will prevent weeds from taking over these spaces in the spring.
  • Aerate your soil to facilitate healthy grass growth.
  • Keep your mower blade setting at least 2-3 inches tall to allow your grass to developer deeper, more drought resistant roots.

Monarch Waystation

The monarch migration is truly one of the world's greatest natural wonders. Did you know that the monarch butterfly is in desperate need of habitats to lay its eggs? The City of Naperville would like to encourage residents to plant monarch waystations in their own backyards.  If your monarch habitat meets or exceeds the general description of a Monarch Waystation set forth below, your habitat may be certified by Monarch Watch as a Monarch Waystation. You may also choose to purchase a weatherproof sign to display, identifying your habitat as an official Monarch Waystation. See the Monarch Waystation tips (PDF) for more information.

Visit MonarchWatch.com for more information

Think Green When You Clean

Spring means improving weather, greening leaves and gathering clutter. Before you begin your cleaning, be sure to check out the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guide to Safer Choice products.

Have You Considered an Edible Landscape?

Edible landscapes bloom with fresh, nourishing fruits, nuts, vegetables and herbs. Residential yards provide a canvas that can be transformed into productive and abundant edible gardens providing many benefits including promotion of locally sourced food supplies.  Have you considered this approach to landscaping your property?   As a starting point, check out Planting Fruit Trees (PDF) for more information.